2 prisoner updates and a film screening on Sunday

Bruno Davert, an engineer worker in the papermaking industry, is a victim of the relocation of his company. He has been on the dole for almost two years, alternating between moments of self-awareness and depression, and confronting the humiliation of job interviews. One day he has a somewhat drastic idea: to treat the labor market like any other market, in other words to do everything possible to eliminate all competition. He obtains the names of the unemployed engineers living in his region and, therefore, potential rivals for a job at the Arcadia factory and kills them one by one.

A timely film by Costas Gavras showing the despare of unemployment, a marathon of surviving into a system that exploits the people’s working power. No one should miss it!!

And here are updates on 2 of the prisoners that we have mentioned before:

The Free Stacy Hyde campaign have made a video about her case and upcoming appeal:

John Tucker of the Tinley Park 5 released

“These past 20 months have been an ordeal to say the least. From court drama to safety issues to just the woes of incarceration itself, this has been a trying process. Yet, even within the darkness of a cell, cut off from the world, some light could still be seen.  Your letters, donation,s and noisy solidarity were things of beauty to eyes forced to view the despair of a broken system day after day and eyes that could not help but watch as any glimmer of hope faded from so many youths as they were dehumanized by the tortuous conditions in which they were forced to dwell. Your zines brought much needed and often obscured information into a citadel of ignorance and fear, your books lifted the weight of monotonous oppression, and your donations aided in the welfare of so many with nothing but the state to care for them. A parcel of food here or some cosmetics there so often mean the difference between another night spent hungry or unclean and a good night’s rest, and never doubt the weight of one’s spirit in a time of need. Sadness, loneliness, and a lack of basic human needs often crush that vital spark necessary for a meaningful, productive, life and sadly press those “corrected” into a self-defeating cycle of unchecked violence or harsh drug use.

For so much I am thankful for the supporters, but of greatest importance was the solidarity. Your constant stream of letters and cards not only kept myself sane, but also gave tangible, physical proof of solidarity which revealed the tremendous weight of the conviction of people from the real world who likewise are willing to make a stand against the far too often accepted evils of the world, to an incarcerated populace who had often not heard of such people before. The attention brought by the constant stream of mail peaked curiosity and drove many to question what was going on. This in turn lead to discussions, which in turn lead to some longer discussions that I hope have made a difference in at least a few lives over the course of my stint of incarceration.

Now that I am free I am no less thankful for everything I have received from our amazing support network, which is in itself a testament to the will of a people willing to sacrifice to make a change. A support network populated by good hearted, noble people who have often suffered first hand under the weight of unchecked and unopposed malice. Thank you once again for everything you have done and continue to do; you are indeed an amazing people.

In Solidarity,

 John Tucker”

Oh aye and Jerry Koch is out as well. Did we mention that before? The reason he’s out is delicious:

“Koch’s argument is straightforward. Because he continues to oppose the government in general and the grand jury process in particular, he urges that continued confinement will not induce him to testify. Indeed, he asserts that his tenure at the MCC has caused his views about government repression to congeal even further.”